Tim Hampson's Beer Blog

The quest for the perfect beer

Turtley Corn Mill, Avowick is the cream of Devon

with 3 comments

A former chicken hatchery has been transformed into a fine pub

You do not have to be driven to the Turtley Corn Mill in an open topped car on a still warm, end of summer’s day, but it helps as is it is a glorious, exhilarating ride though the undulating Devon countryside from the city of Exeter.

The mill wheel remains as a tribute to its former life

The location is idyllic; the original mill is set in six acres of grounds bordered by the River Glazebrook, in Avonwick, South Brent. It has its own small lake complete with an island, perfect for sunny days, idle wandering, the watching of quacking ducks and people playing lawn chess.

Check mate?

Once the site sounded to the clucking and chirping of fowl as for many years it was a chicken hatchery before becoming a pub in the 1970’s. The former mill was transformed by a radical refurbishment in 2005, which has introduced oak and slate floors, bookcases, old furniture and loads of local pictures. However, the old mill wheel remains as a striking reminder of the building’s previous existence. Inside, the style is light and fresh with no music, fruit machines or pool tables, just newspapers to read, books to browse, good food and great local beers.

There is plenty of space in the garden for drinking

My friend opted for a cream topped hot chocolate. I preferred a glass of Otter Bitter from a farm based brewery in East Devon’s Blackdown Hills. The Otter Brewery was set up in 1990 by the McCaig family. Its eco-systems should make most people green with envy. It has a semi-underground eco-cellar built with clay blocks and a sedum roof. And the effluent safely flows out into its own reed bed. I have a particular liking for a bottled beer Otter brewed for sale in the US, Hoppy Otter at 6.8 per cent ABV, which I do not think was ever sold in the UK. However, for me the really great British beers are brewed at about 3.6 per cent ABV. It needs real skill to get so much taste into something we often call in an understated way “ordinary bitter”. There is nothing ordinary about Otter’s Bitter, it is complex and full of ripe fruit notes. With my lunch, I had a glass of St Austell’s IPA, it went well with the local haddock fillet fried in a real ale batter. Well I know it is not a proper IPA, but it is an easy drinking malty –and toffee flavoured beer balanced by some refreshing citrus hops.

Many fine walks surround the pub

After lunch we took a 15 minute walk alongside the river, joined by fellow customers trying to wear dogs and children out. Then back to the car and shunning the A38 we took the winding b-roads back into Exeter. http://www.turtleycornmill.com/

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Written by timhampson

September 13, 2010 at 5:49 pm

3 Responses

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  1. Interesting to hear about the eco measures in place. I wonder how much a sedum roof and cellar contribute to making the beer more green, proportionally? Is there any calculations on energy saving?

    Mark, Real-Ale-Reviews.com

    September 14, 2010 at 6:15 am

  2. As I understand such buildings need fewer resources to light, heat and cool. Therefore they save energy in that way. Adnams in Southwold also has a similar building though on a larger scale. I’ll see if I can find any figures.

    timhampson

    September 14, 2010 at 6:42 am

  3. Sounds like a step in the right direction! Given the lack of efficiencies in micro-brewing (so I’m told!) I’d love to see a run a brewery on sun, wind and or water power, but probably the costs are prohibitive?

    Mark, Real-Ale-Reviews.com

    September 16, 2010 at 7:36 pm


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